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Malahide Castle & Gardens and Malahide Beach in County Dublin in Ireland

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Malahide Castle, parts of which date to the 12th century, lies, with over 260 acres of remaining estate parkland, close to the village of Malahide, nine miles north of central Dublin in Ireland.

Visit: https://www.malahidecastleandgardens.ie/

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

King Henry II gifted Richard Talbot the lands and harbour of Malahide for his services to the crown in 1185. From that point on, the Talbot family became intertwined with Malahide’s history and development.

The original stronghold built on the lands was a wooden fortress but this was eventually superseded by a stone structure on the site of the current Malahide Castle. Over the centuries, rooms and fortifications were added, modified and strengthened until the castle took on its current form.

The Talbots are reputed to have been a diplomatic family and during the eight centuries between 1185 and the 1970s, their tenure at Malahide Castle was broken for only a brief interlude between 1649 and 1660 when their lands were seized by Cromwellian soldiers and the castle was occupied by Myles Corbet, Lord Chief Baron of Ireland.

The final Baron de Malahide, Lord Milo Talbot, lived in the castle until his death in 1973. His sister Rose inherited the estate and subsequently sold it to the Irish State in 1975. Since then, Malahide Castle has continued to play an important part in Ireland’s political and social landscape, hosting international leaders and summits, and welcoming thousands of local and international visitors each year.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

Exotic plants, green space and natural beauty

Set on 260 acres of parkland, the gardens and Butterfly House at Malahide Castle are a tranquil retreat just minutes away from Dublin city centre and airport. Discover 5,000 plant varieties, perfect picnic spots and much more during your visit.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

In the shadow of Malahide Castle’s West Wing lies this enchanted woodland…

Stretching over 20 acres of lush grass and woodland, the West Lawn is home to our Fairy Trail – the most magical part of any visit to Malahide Castle and Gardens. A paradise for photographers, some of the best views of the castle are here. Nature lovers can find rare trees from all over the world. Look out for the famous Cedar of Lebanon, Tasmanian pencil pines and Chinese Ginkgo trees.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

The Irish Sea has played a major role in the development of tourism in the Malahide. The extensive Velvet Strand stretches to the horizon and is extremely popular with bathers, walkers and water sports enthusiasts.

Malahide has a 2km beach, which following an attractive coastal walk leads into the neighbouring Portmarnock beach. It has easy access with good bus and train services from Dublin City. There is also car parking available. This beach is lifeguarded during the summer months and has facilities for the disabled.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

If you’re lucky enough (go on a weekday, or evening) you might even get the entire beach Malahide to yourself. There’s nothing more enthralling than being alone with a vast expanse of beach in front of you, and being free to skip, dance, sing or scream.

Malahide Beach is also good for a sit down. It offers a lovely vista out to Lambay Island, Howth and Ireland’s Eye (depending on how far you walk, that is). Also, take a look on the ground there are some lovely shells to be found if you look hard enough.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

Walking from the village along the beach you’ll come to the wide velvet strand along the Mouth of the Estuary, from here the beach leads to Low Rock, a popular swimming section of the beach. After this the beach gets more rocky as you approach High Rock, for a more challenging swim and eventually if you continue on you will find yourself at Portmarnock beach where the sandy strand opens wide in front of you once more.

From Malahide Beach you can also take the coastal walk on the footpath all the way to Portmarnock (but beware, it’s 5km away so is no stroll through the park.) Malahide is definitely one of the picks of Dublin beaches.

New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos
New photo by We Love Travel / Google Photos

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